The Q#3 quintet, and then some

Here are the five posts on this blog that recorded the most hits between July and September 2014:

  1. Uncertain terrain: Issues and challenges facing housing associations (11th May 2013)
  2. Developments in the ongoing Bedroom Tax saga (6th Sept)
  3. Why is Owen Jones so annoying? (4th July 2013)
  4. The miraculous power of welfare reform (11th Aug)
  5. The value of planning (30th Aug)

 

This quarter feels a bit like deja vu all over again.  [Read more...]

The Q#2 quintet, and more

Here are the five posts on this blog that recorded the most hits between April and June 2014:

  1. Uncertain terrain: Issues and challenges facing housing associations (11th May 2013)
  2. Ed’s brave housing proposal (1st May)
  3. Welfare reforms: the evidence mounts (9th April)
  4. Why is Owen Jones so annoying? (4th July 2013)
  5. The government is solving the housing crisis, apparently (31st May)

[Read more...]

The Q#1 quintet, and more

Here are the five posts on this blog that recorded the most hits between January and March 2014:

  1. Uncertain terrain: Issues and challenges facing housing associations (11th May 2013)
  2. Why is Owen Jones so annoying? (4th July 2013)
  3. My top ten blogs 2013 (29th Dec 2013)
  4. A voyage of rediscovery (4th Jan)
  5. Vince on “social housing” (30th Jan)

[Read more...]

The Q#4 quintet

Here are the five posts on this blog that recorded the most hits between October and December 2013:

  1. On signs you’re reading bad criticism of economics (4th Nov)
  2. Uncertain terrain: Issues and challenges facing housing associations (11th May)
  3. Would post-crash economics be a step backward? (21st Nov)
  4. The Bedroom Tax vote: sticking the knife into the Libdems (12th Nov)
  5. Why is Owen Jones so annoying? (4th July)

November was, by quite a large margin, the busiest month so far on the blog.

This has been an unusual quarter. [Read more...]

My top ten posts of 2013

TOP10This has been a good year for this blog. Although the audience remains relatively modest, traffic has nearly doubled compared with 2012. Thanks for reading.

The blog spent all year in the ebuzzing monthly politics top 100. Such rankings are not to be taken too seriously, but being there is better than not being there! I’m grateful to everyone who thought one of my posts worth retweeting, liking or linking to.

Thanks also to those who crossposted my posts to other group blogs and to all those who took the time to comment on one of my posts during the year.

Here, in reverse order, are my top ten most popular posts of 2013: [Read more...]

The Q#3 quintet

Here are the five posts published on this blog between July and September 2013 that recorded the most hits:

  1. Bedroom tax … and beyond (6th Aug)
  2. Why is Owen Jones so annoying? (4th July)
  3. Free to schmooze (21st July)
  4. ‘Quackademics’ under fire as critical voices targeted (22nd Aug)
  5. Britain’s property problem (15th Aug)

One thing that can be inferred from this list is that September was a relatively quiet month. Nothing quite took off.

One notable feature of this quarter is that Uncertain Terrain: issues and challenges facing housing associations, which was published on 11th May, was only a handful of hits away from making it back into the top five for Q#3. [Read more...]

The Q#2 quintet

Here are the five posts published on this blog between April and June 2013 that recorded the most hits:

  1. Curbing the welfare hate (6th April)
  2. Who is social housing for, and who should it be for? (10th April)
  3. Uncertain terrain: issues and challenges facing housing associations (11th May)
  4. Is a little economics dangerous? (2nd April)
  5. Universal Credit: Some observations on policy and politics (19th June)

I was clearly on a bit of roll at the beginning of April!

One thing that strikes me about this list is that all the posts apart from Curbing the welfare hate are links to longer documents on Scribd.com – including texts prepared for other purposes or to accompany presentations. Also, two other link posts of that type were just outside the top 5 this quarter. This came as a bit of a surprise. I’m not entirely sure what to make of it. Clearly there is some interest in pieces discussing current policy issues at greater length than is possible in a conventional blogpost. Any thoughts welcome. [Read more...]

The Q#1 quintet

Here are the five posts published on this blog between January and March 2013 that recorded the most hits:

  1. Help to buy? (20th March)
  2. The politics of the bedroom tax (9th February)
  3. Clegg courts catastrophe (10th March)
  4. Research and the policy process (13th February)
  5. The boundaries of academic blogging (20th January)

This quarter has seen 3 of the 4 busiest months since the blog started. I’m glad that people are continuing to find these ramblings of some interest. Onward and upward!

Thanks for reading. And commenting. Even when you’re disagreeing with me.

Image: © iQoncept – Fotolia.com

The Q#4 quintet

Here are the five posts published on this blog between October and December 2012 that recorded the most hits:

  1. The maths question in economics (24th October)
  2. Not so Marr-vellous (4th November)
  3. The reopening of the economic mind? (26th November)
  4. Policy challenges around welfare reform (13th November)
  5. Osbo’s poverty trap and pinging the elastic of reality (16th December)

All these posts appear in the list of my top ten posts of 2012, published yesterday. That’s one indication that this has been a good quarter for the blog. Onward and upward!

Thanks for reading. And commenting. Even when you’re disagreeing with me.

Image: © iQoncept – Fotolia.com

My top ten posts of 2012

TOP10This has been quite a good year for this blog. I could never claim my ramblings have mass appeal, but traffic in 2012 has been nearly double that in 2011. This year’s top post recorded twice the hits received by last year’s top post. Half of this year’s top ten posts are from the last quarter of the year. So I’m hoping this is a trend rather than an aberration.

The blog got into the ebuzzing politics top 100 for the first time in June. It has been in the lower reaches of the top 100 for five of the last seven months. Such rankings shouldn’t be taken too seriously, but I’d rather be in the top 100 than outside it.

Thanks for reading over the year. And thanks if you also took time to comment. Sometimes responding to comments is as helpful in clarifying thinking as writing the original post.

Here are the ten posts which recorded the most hits this year: [Read more...]